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Freedom Works

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The National Organization for Women (NOW) is the biggest organization of feminist protesters in the America. Currently, the organization constitutes of over 500,000 causative members, over 500 locals, and college grounds/university grounds affiliates in all the fifty states and the Columbia District. From the time when it was founded in 1966, the NOW's objective has been "to take action" and result in equality for every woman. Both the achievements that NOW take and its take on the issues are principled, inflexible and frequently in front of their time (Worell, 2001). The National Organization for Women is a leader, not a devotee of the estimation of the community. This essay provides a summary of the National Organization for Women (NOW) and the significance behind its formation.

The Start of NOW

In 1880, Mrs. H. Griswold composed in a letter to Susan B. Anthony saying, "Words fail to convey the bitter hatred I have for the foul demagogues who would take from me the freedom they claim for themselves" (Barakso, 2005). In 1909, Emma Goldman put in writing "A New Declaration of Independence," in which she affirmed the patently obvious truth that every human irrespective of ethnic group, color, or gender are born with one and the same privileges (Barakso, 2005). Following a year later, Margaret Sanger clarified the ethics of controlling birth in a sermon so titled. Through the post of World War II period, such resilient feminist influences were diminishing in figure and quantity; the impetus of the feminist society that triumphed suffrage and extended the rights of women earlier in the 20th century had gotten smaller (Keetley & Pettegrew, 2002). An off-putting media blitz announced the passing away of feminism and commemorated the happy, inhabited housewife.

However, with the emergence of the movement that supported civil rights, feminists once more made their position in the grounds of politics. The 1964 Civil Rights Act happened to Congress, and feminists pushed hard for the surcharge of an alteration that forbids sex inequity in employment (Worell, 2001). Following much discussions, the Act was approved with definitely such exclusion in Title VII— enhanced by a congressman who desired to overcome the Act by bringing in sex. However, Title VII was nevertheless a shallow shield for females in the labor force.

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) was started in 1965 to put into practice Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act (Keetley & Pettegrew, 002). Though the future leader  of NOW, Aileen Hernandez and originator Richard Graham contested hard as commissioners of the EEO to put into effect Title VII's exclusion on sex inequity, unfortunately, they were eventually outnumbered 3-2, and the EEOC made a decision in September 1965 that sex separation in work advertising was allowable.

After a month, at a meeting on Title VII and the EEOC, Dr. Pauli Murray, who was a law lecturer at Yale and part of the Commission of the President on the Status of Women, condemned the EEOC and its position authorizing Help Wanted Male and Help Wanted Female separated job marketing. Betty Friedan, writer of The Feminine Mystique book, instantly got in touch with Dr. Murray, who was one of the various historic linkups that resulted to a comeback of the feminist society in America (Barakso, 2005).

The Rise of a New Civil Rights Organization

By October, some three hundred men and women had befallen charter affiliates. The organizing meeting was October 29th – 30th in Washington, D.C., but only thirty of the three hundred charter affiliates participated. The NOW's elegance for making a few appear like many, might have started with this first official conference.

The lineup of various officers was chosen as nominated together with Kathryn (Kay) Clarenbach as the Board Chairlady; Betty Friedan as the President; Aileen Hernandez - who had proclaimed her impending quit from the EEOC in being absent - as the Executive Vice President;  Richard Graham as the Vice President;  and Caroline Davis as the Secretary/Treasurer . They took on a Statement of Purpose with extensive worries, addressing every woman and every aspect of their lives. It resembles with a fanatical pledge to the global rebellion of human rights now happening within and outside national limits, and remains in several ways an eternal manuscript.

The meeting settled on an arrangement that will give essential power to the entire association in national meetings that would be conducted annually.  Between the conferences, the nationwide board of thirty-five as well as the five nationwide officers was to be liberated to act, gathering every three months. Again, between its gatherings, the five officials were liberated to execute decided policy. Practically, a similar structure persists today (Worell, 2001). The meeting approved instant exploit on Title VII’s efforts of enforcement and certified an official committee that would taake action in aid of flight helpers and to face up to the so-called defensive labor legislation. According to Schmidt and Shelley (2012), they created task forces on subject after subject, and those chore forces performed a lot of schedule and doings of the early NOW.

In a 1966 account on the talks, Friedan (he was the one who drafted the manuscript) wrote that they did not dwell much on ceremonials and dialogues and that they gave themselves hardly an hour for refreshment. She added by saying that, sometimes they got so exhausted and intolerant, but there was for all time a sagacity that what they were settling on was not only for that particular period, but for years to come. They shared a touching moment of understanding that they had then certainly entered history.

The Third Nationwide Meeting of Committees on Women Status

Among hundreds of spokespersons at this meeting in Washington D.C. held on 28th - 30th days of June, 1966, were Friedan and Murray. Their thesis was "Targets for Action," and scores of delegates desired to pass a declaration that demanded the EEOC to carry out its official mandate to bring to end of sex inequity in employment. They were also informed that they had no power, not even to ratify a decree, but they were strong-minded to be decisive. Betty Friedan was present at the talks as a journalist and spectator and was closely observing the hard work of Hernandez and Graham to put into effect Title VII. Friedan had mentioned that both representatives and attorney of the EEOC, Sonia Pressman Fuentes was confidentially suggesting the call for an association to speak in support of women in the manner that the civil rights sets did for Blacks.

Conclusion

The goal of equality for every woman is currently a major factor that brought about evenness for women in America. In addition, it is witnessed that in most schools, places of work, justice systems and all other societal sectors, the number of harassments and discrimination has reduced. Nevertheless, NOW is still in collaboration with the American government and are working to bring to an end to these vices completely. They are also securing abortions; controlling birth and providing rights of reproduction for every woman; bringing to an end to any and every form of violence committed against women; eliminating racism, sexism and homophobia; and finally promoting fairness and justice to the women in the society.

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